Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 2

In the previous post, I discussed OSHA relative to its reliability as a standard on which to judge the applicability of safety concepts. One way of looking at the field of safety is how to implement OSHA standards effectively, comprehensively, intelligently, and organically. With any type of measurement, whether quantitative with a ruler or qualitative … More Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 2

Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 1

Systems Thinking generally is evaluating a larger thing by not just the function of individual parts but also how they interact as a whole. “Thing” can be just about anything; we are interested in the multi-dimensional interaction of people, equipment, government, environment, and money flow that comprises a single organization’s place in its market. These … More Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 1

Stairwells and the Codes

Being that humans are creatures of habit, an uneven stairwell challenges users, even those grown familiar with asymmetries in construction. The most critical components of a stairwell to avoid becoming a tripping or slipping hazard include a decent (and uniform) tread and riser value. In the case of International Building Code specifications, this is 11 … More Stairwells and the Codes

Incidents & Accident Models

There are various models that emphasize different components that combined into an accident. While Heinrich’s Axioms of Industrial Safety are most widely applied, there are others that target relationships among the contributing factors to an injury. As a brief introduction, I’d like to share a few of our investigations and a model that aligns with … More Incidents & Accident Models