Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 2

In the previous post, I discussed OSHA relative to its reliability as a standard on which to judge the applicability of safety concepts. One way of looking at the field of safety is how to implement OSHA standards effectively, comprehensively, intelligently, and organically. With any type of measurement, whether quantitative with a ruler or qualitative … More Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 2

Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 1

Systems Thinking generally is evaluating a larger thing by not just the function of individual parts but also how they interact as a whole. “Thing” can be just about anything; we are interested in the multi-dimensional interaction of people, equipment, government, environment, and money flow that comprises a single organization’s place in its market. These … More Systemic Organizational Failure Root Cause: Safety as a Standard, Part 1

Organizational Failure Part 2: Crucial Deming Points

Dr. Deming was instrumental in rebuilding Japan after WW2; his radical innovation in quality control methods is summed up in 14 qualitative management guidelines. Some of these are critical to addressing and preventing organizational failure but interestingly not all. Note that in the case of systemic failure, the failure is unique in spreading between teams/organizations. … More Organizational Failure Part 2: Crucial Deming Points